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Taxi Service & Yoga Solitude

Taxi Service

Recently Ileana returned back from a trip to her native country, Greece, where she spent much of her time on an island where the primary modes of travel are walking, swimming, and riding a donkey – as no motorized vehicles of any kind are allowed on the island.

Ileana writes:

Hydra. A unique island. Perfect solitude for yoga practice. You must experience it!

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Sounds like an ideal place for a meditative retreat and outdoor yoga practice!!


This is the view from Ileana’s sister’s house…

Hydra-3

Not too many stressful days living in this abode!


Here are a few more scenic shots of the island:

Hydra -1

Hydra - 2


Here are a few facts about the island courtesy of Wikipedia:

Hydra (Greek: Ύδρα, pronounced [ˈiðra] in modern Greek) is one of the Saronic Islands of Greece, located in the Aegean Sea between the Saronic Gulf and the Argolic Gulf. It is separated from the Peloponnese by narrow strip of water. In ancient times, the island was known as Hydrea (Υδρέα, derived from the Greek word for “water”), which was a reference to the springs on the island.

The municipality of Hydra consists of the islands Hydra (area 52 km2 (20.1 sq mi)), Dokos (pop. 18, area 13.5 km2 (5.2 sq mi)) and a few uninhabited islets. The province of Hydra (Greek: Επαρχία Ύδρας) was one of the provinces of the Piraeus Prefecture. Its territory corresponded with that of the current municipality. It was abolished in 2006.

There is one main town, known simply as “Hydra port” (pop. 1,900 in 2011). It consists of a crescent-shaped harbour, around which is centered a strand of restaurants, shops, markets, and galleries that cater to tourists and locals (Hydriots). Steep stone streets lead up and outwards from the harbor area. Most of the local residences, as well as the hostelries on the island are located on these streets. Other small villages or hamlets on the island include Mandraki (pop. 11), Kamini, Vlychos (19), Palamidas, Episkopi, and Molos.

Hydra depends upon tourism, and Athenians comprise a sizeable segment of its visitors. High speed hydrofoils and catamarans from Piraeus, some 37 nautical miles (69 km) away, serve Hydra, stopping first at Poros before going on to Spetses. There is a passenger ferry service providing an alternative to Hydrofoils which runs from Hydra Harbour to Metochi on the Peloponnese coast. Many Athenians drive to Metochi, leave their car in the secure car park and take the 20 minute passenger ferry across to Hydra.

Rubbish trucks are the only motor vehicles on the island, as cars or motorcycles are not allowed by law. Horses, mules and donkeys, and water taxis provide public transportation. The inhabited area, however, is so compact that most people walk everywhere.

Hydra benefits from numerous bays and natural harbours, and has a strong maritime culture. The island remains a popular yachting destination, and is the home of the Kamini Yacht Club, an international yacht club based in the port of Kamini.

In 2007, a National Geographic Traveler panel of 522 experts rated Hydra the highest of any Greek Island (ranked 11th out of 111 islands worldwide) as a unique destination preserving its “integrity of place”.


And here’s Ileana – holding strong as usual…

Ileana - Plank

 

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